Tips for Better Conversation Just in Time for Thanksgiving!

placeholder image

Tips for Better Conversation Just in Time for Thanksgiving!

“Better Conversation Week” always falls on the same week of Thanksgiving and for good reason. This week marks the beginning of the holiday season full of family dinners and parties with friends and lots of opportunities for conversations to arise. Below are tips from a Reader’s Digest article to help make you a better conversationalist.   
 
1. Avoid unnecessary details.
If portions of your story are not needed to get the point across, leave them out. Stay away from sidetracking the conversation.
 
2. Don’t ask another question before the previous one is answered.
If you asked someone about their family or job, don’t intervene with another question or your own information in regards to your family or job. 
 
3. Do not interrupt while the other person is speaking.
Try and keep your information short and to the point, that way no one will interrupt the conversation.
 
4. Do not contradict, especially if it is not important.
By contradicting you are inserting information into a person’s story that is usually not necessary. “The person who contradicts, frequently restates the matter in another way.”
 
5. Do not do all the talking.
Ask questions to keep the other person or people involved in the conversation. It will keep the conversation from being one sided.
 
6. Don’t always be the hero of the story.
Every story needs a hero, but it does not need to be you at all times. You can build up the others in the story along with yourself.
 
7. Choose a subject of shared interest.
Don’t keep the conversation based on one topic if that is not the interest of all the parties involved.
 
8. Be a good listener.
If you follow the above rules, listening will come naturally.
 
9. The conversation should be in harmony with the environment.
Do not “talk about cheese when the moon would be a more fitting topic.” Also, silence can sometimes be appropriate.
 
10. Do not exaggerate.
Not everything is “the best”, “the worst”, or “the funniest.”
 
11. Do not misquote.
“Use the quotation for the occasion; do not make an occasion for the quotation.”
 
12. Develop tact.
There is no need to be untruthful, but there is also no need to be hurtful. Do not use the conversation to comment on how someone looks whether they look tired, sick or unwell. It will make the other person uncomfortable and in turn halt your conversation. Keep with the old saying, “If you have nothing nice to say, don’t say anything at all.” Remember, silence is ok at times.
 
Here is to making this holiday season filled with good conversation. 
Posted: 11/25/2015 3:02:26 PM by Heather Dupree
Filed under:


Trackback URL: https://bocagrove.org/trackback/efb4a465-f854-4d73-a89c-6d0783b878d5/Tips_for_Better_Conversation_Just_in_Time_for_Thanksgiving!.aspx?culture=en-US